There are 6 different types of pedestrian crossing:- School crossing, Zebra, Pelican, Puffin, Toucan and Pegasus.

You MUST NOT park on a crossing or in the area covered by the zig-zag lines. You MUST NOT overtake the moving vehicle nearest the crossing

 

School crossing, 

                                           

You must stop when a school crossing patrol shows a stop for children sign.

it is an offence not to Stop when signalled to do so:
When a school crossing patrol officer steps into the road you must Stop:

There may be a flashing amber signal below the school warning sign to alert you that children may be crossing the road ahead. Drive slowly until you are clear of the area. Be cautious when passing a stationary bus showing a school bus sign.

Zebra:       


A Zebra crossing is a path across a road marked with black and white stripes where pedestrians may cross.

Drivers approaching a Zebra crossing is made aware of the crossing because of its black and white poles with flashing yellow beacons and zig-zag road markings.

As you approach a zebra crossing look out for people waiting to cross and be ready to slow down or stop to let them cross. Use your mirrors frequently on approach so you know exactly what following traffic is up to and stop before the white dotted line - not after it.
You MUST give way when someone has moved onto a crossing. Do Not wave people across; this could be dangerous if another vehicle is approaching and don't flash your headlights! Try and make eye contact with anyone waiting. This helps reassure them that they have been seen.

Pelican:- (Pedestrian Light Controlled Crossing)

   


These are signal-controlled crossings operated by pedestrians.
Drivers approaching a Pelican crossing is made aware of the crossing because of its traffic lights and zig-zag road markings.
Plan what you are going to do before you get there. If, for example, the lights are on green for some time and people are waiting at the crossing, be prepared to slow down as they could turn to red! Use your mirrors frequently on approach so you know exactly what following traffic is up to and stop on the white line - not after it!
These are signal-controlled crossings where flashing amber follows the red 'Stop' light. You MUST stop when the red light shows. When the amber light is flashing, you MUST give way to any pedestrians on the crossing. If the amber light is flashing and there are no pedestrians on the crossing, you may proceed with caution.
After the lights start flashing, watch out for people making a last-minute dash. Be prepared to let them cross but no not wave others onto the crossing.

Puffin (Pedestrian User-Friendly Intelligent crossings)

                                                   

These differ from pelican crossings as there is no flashing green figure phase. On puffin crossings the red and green figures are above the control box on your side of the road. Press the button and wait for the green figure to show..
Infra-red cameras extend the time drivers see the red light so elderly or disabled people aren't at risk from oncoming traffic.
Drivers approaching a Puffin crossing is made aware of the crossing because of its traffic lights and zig-zag road markings.
The lights have no flashing amber phase, so the lights just change like a normal traffic light at a junction.

Toucan:- (Two-Can Cross)

                                      


On toucan crossings cyclists are permitted to ride across the road.
Drivers approaching a Toucan crossing is made aware of the crossing because of its traffic lights and usually zig-zag road markings (zig-zag marking are not always present)
The lights have no flashing amber phase, so the lights just change like a normal traffic light at a junction.

Pegasus

                                                                        


The Pegasus crossing is similar to any other light controlled crossing, but in addition to provision for pedestrians (as at a Puffin Crossing) and/or cyclists (as at a Toucan crossing) the Pegasus crossing makes special provision for horses.
For riders there is a 'high level' push button to operate the crossing. Because this is placed on the traffic-light support, the horse has to come very close to the road in order for the button to be pressed ... So be careful!